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Quite often we hear, “It takes a village to raise a child”.

But what does it mean? What does the term village really mean and why does a village help you to raise your child anyway?

Back in the Stone Age, cavemen would go hunting, and women would tend to the fire, fields, and farming, care of the children, the cleaning, and preserve tribal harmony. There were women who were very possibly relatives that would look after the children when other women needed to work in the fields, etc.

Fast forward to today’s busy society, you will find that we have lost that sense of village and community. Oftentimes, new parents don’t have relatives that live in the same city, state, or even continent.

We now find ourselves yearning for that sense of unconditional support, the village. Especially for those couples who are ready to start a family, the importance of a village becomes that much more relative and desired.

Being able to have a sense of community, mentorship, and guidance when raising a child is not only important for the parents, but also for the child. Having that familiarity and supportive people around creates bonds of comfort and security.

Not all people in your community, or your village, need to be relatives. Oftentimes, someone who is either going through the same experiences or who can relate to and understand your situation can help to create that sense of belonging.

Finding your village is important as it can provide a sense of purpose and well-being, a reason to interact with others, and it has numerous health benefits. It’s a natural way for us humans to thrive in a community.

As you are creating and building and growing your family and family’s foundations, try to surround yourself with people who have the same morals and priorities, the people who challenge you to be better, but who also support you and are there for you when you need help.

If there is a community of like-minded women or men with who you feel connected through your hobbies, academics, sports, or simply having children in the same schools or activities, make sure you choose to nurture those relationships. You simply never know when you might need to tap into that sense of comfort and belonging that only your village can offer you.

I still, to this day, cherish the times I spent in my hometown village of Czechoslovakia. Surrounded by friends, family, and neighbors, those are the moments that fill me with comfort; and I will always be grateful to have been able to experience those special moments.